Category:land art

Conversations I: Rob Carter, the first in a new series by resident curator Oana Tanase


TYPOLOGY is pleased to announce the launch of Conversations, a new series exploring research-based arts by Curator-in-Residence, Oana Tanase. Her first interview features Brooklyn-based artist, Rob Carter. 

Rob Carter was born in Worcester, UK and currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He received his BFA from The Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art at Oxford University and later received an MFA in Studio Art from Hunter College in New York. He has shown his work internationally, with solo exhibitions at Art In General in New York, Galerie Stefan Röpke in Cologne, Station Independent Projects in New York, Galeria Arnés y Ropke in Madrid and Fondazione Pastificio Cerere in Rome. He has also exhibited at Centre Pompidou-Metz in France, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan, The Field Museum in Chicago, Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

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Ashes to dust: Swept Away at the Museum of Arts and Design

While in New York, we stopped off at the Museum of Arts and Design to see Swept Away: Dust, Ashes and Dirt in Contemporary Art and Design. Part of a series of exhibitions that “explore the intersection of traditional or unusual materials and techniques as viewed through the lens of contemporary art and design,” Swept Away features painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video, performances, and installations which confront “the ephemeral nature of art and life, the quality and content of memory, issues of loss and disintegration, and the detritus of human existence” through the incorporation of fugitive and often discarded materials.

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The Wind Paintings of Bob Verschueren

Following up today’s sublime nature theme, here are some exquisitely beautiful works from the late 1970s that blur boundaries between Land Art, painting, and photography. Utilizing terre verte, burnt umber, iron oxide and other powdered substances, Verschueren worked with the land, water, and wind to create these ephemeral images.

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