Opening May 7th: On The Surface | Susana Reisman, a CONTACT Featured Exhibition


TYPOLOGY is pleased to present On The Surface | Susana Reisman, featuring the Toronto-based artist’s latest findings from her multi-year investigation into the nature of wood. Encompassing aspects of both drawing and painting even as it foregrounds relationships between sculpture and photography, the exhibition includes a selection of large-scale colour photographs and several freestanding wood sculptures.

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Conversations I: Rob Carter, the first in a new series by resident curator Oana Tanase


TYPOLOGY is pleased to announce the launch of Conversations, a new series exploring research-based arts by Curator-in-Residence, Oana Tanase. Her first interview features Brooklyn-based artist, Rob Carter. 

Rob Carter was born in Worcester, UK and currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He received his BFA from The Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art at Oxford University and later received an MFA in Studio Art from Hunter College in New York. He has shown his work internationally, with solo exhibitions at Art In General in New York, Galerie Stefan Röpke in Cologne, Station Independent Projects in New York, Galeria Arnés y Ropke in Madrid and Fondazione Pastificio Cerere in Rome. He has also exhibited at Centre Pompidou-Metz in France, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan, The Field Museum in Chicago, Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia and Museum of Arts and Design in New York.

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TYPOLOGY presents Elemental | Book Works by Cathryn Miller


As we head into late fall, the chill in the air and the leaves underfoot put us in mind of the seasons and the stars, elemental concepts evoking cycles, rituals, and deeply held wishes. Not coincidentally, such themes form the conceptual threads weaving much of Saskatchewan artist Cathryn Miller’s work together, and so it is with a sense of both celebratory anticipation and seasonal cheer that we announce our next exhibition.

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Paul Wackers: Almost Somewhere


This weekend is your last chance to catch Paul Wackers’ gem of a show at Narwhal Projects in the Junction. Titled Almost Somewhere, Wackers’ lovingly crafted paintings suffuse the orderly arrangements of still lifes and interiors with the disruptive energies of emergent or external forces and frameworks, transporting the viewer to a place between Wacker’s real and imagined worlds. Richly detailed textures and colours describing beloved collections of rocks, pots, and plants are juxtaposed with boldly graphic lines, planes, patterns, and shapes both hard-edged and fuzzed out, creating a playful and mysterious tension between the everyday and the extraordinary. Go see it if you can; Almost Somewhere is great place to get lost.

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The erasures of Aliki Braine (plus a Palíndromo postscript)


Aliki Braine’s altered images speak to obliteration in its many forms. Synonymous with annihilation, eradication, extinction, ruination, and termination, the act of obliterating implies a kind of killing, and at first glance her images, like memento mori, conspire to remind us that all life inevitably ends. (From the Online Etymology Dictionary: memento mori, n. “reminder of death,” 1590s, from Latin, lit. “remember that you must die.”)

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The Line


Last fall, we came across this incredible image and queued it up to post. Then Sandy hit, and suddenly this image was both more and less relevant than ever. In the intervening months, as recovery turned to rebuilding along the Eastern Seaboard, we took a hiatus to make final preparations for our launch. This March, as winter transitions to spring, TYPOLOGY crosses one more line in its own journey toward existence, as The Line becomes our first post from our new website.

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The air up there: Kimmirut Weather and Constructed Land

Summer travels always put us in mind of the weather and its extremes. Between sunny skies, stifling heat, and sudden storms, we become exquisitely aware of the weather, and how it may impact our precious few days of vacation. We check the five-day forecast, we debate packing the rainwear, and once we’ve left, we keep tabs on the weather back home, glad to be free from the heat of the city, or sad that we are missing out on some of the best metropolitan weather in weeks.

Perhaps with this in mind, Interaccess opened their summer season with an exhibition based in the documentation of weather from the far northern territory of Nunavut. We were lucky enough to have seen Constructed Land earlier in the month and had planned to write a review of it before leaving; that didn’t happen. Now we’re back, the exhibition is closed, and we’re offering up a brief après-view instead.

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